suite limpet
September 20, 2012

Suite Limpet

Suite Limpet, a theatrical site-specific installation piece by Dru Colbert and Lisa Leaverton, will premier in Otter Creek, on Mount Desert Island on Sept. 28. Using sculpture, performance, music, and science, the installation will conjure the human history of Otter Creek and its waterfront, reminding participants of the connection between humans and the natural world.

Performances begin promptly at 5:45 p.m. at the Otter Creek Hall, and are scheduled for Sept. 28, 29, 30, and Oct. 5, 6, and 7.

The cast is comprised of island community members, some of whom are dressed as limpets—snails that, says Colbert, “are tenacious characters that live in the intertidal zone. When they clamp down, you can’t pull them off.

In this work, Colbert and Leaverton focus on what Colbert calls, “transitional or in-between areas that evoke a sense of mystery and wonder,” such as dusk, the autumnal equinox, and the intertidal zone. The artists are also interested in how information gets disseminated—from formal scientific lectures to atmospheric innuendos, and how these shape our perceptions, experiences, and memories of particular places.

Addie Beal as Madame Theresa de Gregoire in Dru Colbert’s Suite Limpet,

The Otter Creek Hall is the starting point for the performance, which will take place in three locations: at the hall, on a bus, and at the Otter Creek waterfront. The limpets perform a clown-like chorus, with physical humor and dance. Other characters include limpet experts Helen Hess and Sean Todd, COA faculty members in biology; Galileo, played alternately by former COA theater faculty member Lucy Bell Sellers and current COA staff member Jarly Bobadilla; bus tour guides Tams Redfield, Eliza Vallette, and Robert Phipps; and Addie Beal, a student at Northeast Harbor Elementary School, as Madam Theresa de Gregoire, who was granted the eastern half of MDI by Massachusetts with her husband in 1787. A multitude of additional performers play roles such as fishermen and “people from away—way away.”

Leaverton, writer and director, is a collaborative artist and activist from Brooklyn, NY, who has taught at COA. She began working as a performance artist while studying violin at Peabody Institute at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore, MD.

Colbert is a faculty member in the arts at COA. Suite Limpet is the third in a trilogy of performance and installation events she has created that are focused on the landscape, history, and folklore of Mt. Desert Island and sited specifically in various locations on the island at different times of the year. Previous works in this series include Graupel, performed on frozen Somes Pond in January of 2007, and Flotsam, a shadow play performed in 2009 at the Otter Creek Hall and again in 2011 as part of the 250th anniversary of Mt. Desert Island. These works explore human activity and memory associated with the surrounding landscape, intended to conjure the hidden histories of human occupation and experience on the island—those not covered in the guidebooks or park brochures

Audience members are asked to bring binoculars and flashlights to use during the event, and rain gear in case of rain. Due to limited seating, all reservations and on-line donations in the form of tickets should be made in advance. Proceeds will benefit the Aid Society of Otter Creek. To reserve tickets for the performances Sept. 28-30 and Oct. 5-7, visit http://limpet.brownpapertickets.com. For more information, contact Dru Colbert at dcolbert@coa.edu or 207-288-5015.

RELEASE
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC’S DRU COLBERT PRESENTS “SUITE LIMPET”
Site-specific piece set in Otter Creek continues artist’s performance work
CONTACT: Donna Gold, Public Relations: 207-801-5623, 207-266-4470, dgold@coa.edu

BAR HARBOR, ME—Suite Limpet, a theatrical site-specific installation piece by Dru Colbert and Lisa Leaverton, will premier in Otter Creek, on Mount Desert Island on Sept. 28. Using sculpture, performance, music, and science, the installation will conjure the human history of Otter Creek and its waterfront, reminding participants of the connection between humans and the natural world.

Performances begin promptly at 5:45 p.m. at the Otter Creek Hall, and are scheduled for Sept. 28, 29, 30, and Oct. 5, 6, and 7.

The cast is comprised of island community members, some of whom are dressed as limpets—snails that, says Colbert, “are tenacious characters that live in the intertidal zone. When they clamp down, you can’t pull them off.”

In this work, Colbert and Leaverton focus on what Colbert calls, “transitional or in-between areas that evoke a sense of mystery and wonder,” such as dusk, the autumnal equinox, and the intertidal zone. The artists are also interested in how information gets disseminated—from formal scientific lectures to atmospheric innuendos, and how these shape our perceptions, experiences, and memories of particular places.

The Otter Creek Hall is the starting point for the performance, which will take place in three locations: at the hall, on a bus, and at the Otter Creek waterfront. The limpets perform a clown-like chorus, with physical humor and dance. Other characters include limpet experts Helen Hess and Sean Todd, COA faculty members in biology; Galileo, played alternately by former COA theater faculty member Lucy Bell Sellers and current COA staff member Jarly Bobadilla; bus tour guides Tams Redfield, Eliza Vallette, and Robert Phipps; and Addie Beal, a student at Northeast Harbor Elementary School, as Madam Theresa de Gregoire, who was granted the eastern half of MDI by Massachusetts with her husband in 1787. A multitude of additional performers play roles such as fishermen and “people from away—way away.”

Leaverton, writer and director, is a collaborative artist and activist from Brooklyn, NY, who has taught at COA. She began working as a performance artist while studying violin at Peabody Institute at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore, MD.

Colbert is a faculty member in the arts at COA. Suite Limpet is the third in a trilogy of performance and installation events she has created that are focused on the landscape, history, and folklore of Mt. Desert Island and sited specifically in various locations on the island at different times of the year. Previous works in this series include Graupel, performed on frozen Somes Pond in January of 2007, and Flotsam, a shadow play performed in 2009 at the Otter Creek Hall and again in 2011 as part of the 250th anniversary of Mt. Desert Island. These works explore human activity and memory associated with the surrounding landscape, intended to conjure the hidden histories of human occupation and experience on the island—those not covered in the guidebooks or park brochures.

Audience members are asked to bring binoculars and flashlights to use during the event, and rain gear in case of rain. Due to limited seating, all reservations and on-line donations in the form of tickets should be made in advance. Proceeds will benefit the Aid Society of Otter Creek. To reserve tickets for the performances Sept. 28-30 and Oct. 5-7, visit http://limpet.brownpapertickets.com. For more information, contact Dru Colbert at dcolbert@coa.edu or 207-288-5015.

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